"A writer is someone for whom writing is more difficult than for other people"

- Thomas Mann

The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Watching a literary chicken come home to roost, in novel form

Posted on 2014-09-17 06:35:00

This is a story of chickens coming home to roost in the nicest possible way. In the early 1980s, I founded and edited an annual anthology of creative writing by Montreal and area high school students called First Fruits. Cash prizes for winners in the categories of poetry, fiction and essays attracted some excellent writing over the 25 years of its lifespan. In 1985, then in Grade 10, one Daniel Goodwin submitted several poems. They were so cognitively mature and aesthetically polished that I at first suspected they were plagiarized. They weren’t. Daniel was that good a poet, and won first prize. It was only later that I learned he was the son of recognized poet, Bill Goodwin, nephew and friend of Irving Layton. In recent years, I wondered if Daniel had made a career in writing. It turns out he had, but not as a poet (Layton’s constant, formidable presence in his life provoked a healthy yearning for non-poetic horizons). He has worked in journalism and is presently a communications executive for the Canadian operations of an international oil and gas company in Alberta. I found all this out when, a few months ago, he popped back into my life with a preview gift of his finely crafted and entertaining first novel, Sons and Fathers, which launches this week. It’s about a politician, the writer who propels him to leadership, the writer who speaks truth to power, and the symbiotic relationships they form The novel’s title conjures up Ivan Turgenev’s 1862 novel, Fathers and Sons, but the similarity ends there. Turgenev’s plot concerns a new generation of nihilists rebelling against the traditional Christian-based order of Russian life. Goodwin’s protagonists are not alienated rebels. On the contrary, it would be hard to find more civicly engaged Canadians, or sons more respectful of their fathers. Thematically, Sons and Fathers is about words that change the lives of........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Watching a literary chicken come home to roost, in novel form

Posted on 2014-09-17 06:35:00

This is a story of chickens coming home to roost in the nicest possible way. In the early 1980s, I founded and edited an annual anthology of creative writing by Montreal and area high school students called First Fruits. Cash prizes for winners in the categories of poetry, fiction and essays attracted some excellent writing over the 25 years of its lifespan. In 1985, then in Grade 10, one Daniel Goodwin submitted several poems. They were so cognitively mature and aesthetically polished that I at first suspected they were plagiarized. They weren’t. Daniel was that good a poet, and won first prize. It was only later that I learned he was the son of recognized poet, Bill Goodwin, nephew and friend of Irving Layton. In recent years, I wondered if Daniel had made a career in writing. It turns out he had, but not as a poet (Layton’s constant, formidable presence in his life provoked a healthy yearning for non-poetic horizons). He has worked in journalism and is presently a communications executive for the Canadian operations of an international oil and gas company in Alberta. I found all this out when, a few months ago, he popped back into my life with a preview gift of his finely crafted and entertaining first novel, Sons and Fathers, which launches this week. It’s about a politician, the writer who propels him to leadership, the writer who speaks truth to power, and the symbiotic relationships they form The novel’s title conjures up Ivan Turgenev’s 1862 novel, Fathers and Sons, but the similarity ends there. Turgenev’s plot concerns a new generation of nihilists rebelling against the traditional Christian-based order of Russian life. Goodwin’s protagonists are not alienated rebels. On the contrary, it would be hard to find more civicly engaged Canadians, or sons more respectful of their fathers. Thematically, Sons and Fathers is about words that change the lives of........

Read Full Article