"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Forty years with Rabbi Ron

Posted on 2016-02-09 15:13:00

Our shul is looking for a new rabbi. After 40 years of robust, dedicated ministry, Rabbi Ron is retiring. We’re happy to see him planning new adventures in Jewish learning and spiritual growth. He has been a faithful servant of To-Whom-It-May-Concern, which is the jokey way we Reconstructionist Jews refer to the God in whom we don’t officially believe, but who called us to his service at Mount Sinai 3,000 years ago. We’re lucky we got Rabbi Ron. He had a choice to make between us and some shul in Colorado. He chose us because “here they know what Dijon mustard is” and because it isn’t that far from his home in upstate New York. Yes, of course American. The pickings for homegrown rabbis are pretty slim in Canada. Rabbi Ron was fresh out of rabbinical college when we hired him, all of 27, a knapsack on his back, and brimming with enthusiasm. I hosted a dinner for Ron at our home to mark the occasion. It was a jolly affair, but then, as everyone made to depart, Ron asked in some confusion, “So … am I hired?” We looked at each other in bewilderment. We had been so pleased about our decision, we had completely forgotten to inform him that he was officially ours. Most rabbis come to shuls already married. Ron was a bachelor but eager to find his beshert Ron and I had a good laugh about that for years. I was only a few years older than him, and we became fast friends. We first bonded over our mutual love for the offbeat late night comic TV soap opera, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, which starred Louise Lasser (Woody Allen’s first wife) as the eponymous neurotic, depressed housewife. It cracked us both up, and we’d lovingly retrace the best lines of the week at Kiddush after Shabbat services. Most rabbis come to shuls already married. Ron was a bachelor but eager to find his beshert (soul mate). You have to be a special kind of woman to want to be a........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Forty years with Rabbi Ron

Posted on 2016-02-09 15:13:00

Our shul is looking for a new rabbi. After 40 years of robust, dedicated ministry, Rabbi Ron is retiring. We’re happy to see him planning new adventures in Jewish learning and spiritual growth. He has been a faithful servant of To-Whom-It-May-Concern, which is the jokey way we Reconstructionist Jews refer to the God in whom we don’t officially believe, but who called us to his service at Mount Sinai 3,000 years ago. We’re lucky we got Rabbi Ron. He had a choice to make between us and some shul in Colorado. He chose us because “here they know what Dijon mustard is” and because it isn’t that far from his home in upstate New York. Yes, of course American. The pickings for homegrown rabbis are pretty slim in Canada. Rabbi Ron was fresh out of rabbinical college when we hired him, all of 27, a knapsack on his back, and brimming with enthusiasm. I hosted a dinner for Ron at our home to mark the occasion. It was a jolly affair, but then, as everyone made to depart, Ron asked in some confusion, “So … am I hired?” We looked at each other in bewilderment. We had been so pleased about our decision, we had completely forgotten to inform him that he was officially ours. Most rabbis come to shuls already married. Ron was a bachelor but eager to find his beshert Ron and I had a good laugh about that for years. I was only a few years older than him, and we became fast friends. We first bonded over our mutual love for the offbeat late night comic TV soap opera, Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman, which starred Louise Lasser (Woody Allen’s first wife) as the eponymous neurotic, depressed housewife. It cracked us both up, and we’d lovingly retrace the best lines of the week at Kiddush after Shabbat services. Most rabbis come to shuls already married. Ron was a bachelor but eager to find his beshert (soul mate). You have to be a special kind of woman to want to be a........

Read Full Article