"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

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Barbara Kay: Unborn babies will stay persons in fact, but not in law

Posted on 2016-05-03 11:37:00

In December 2014 Cassandra Kaake of Windsor, Ont., was murdered in her seventh month of pregnancy, and so her already-named unborn baby Molly died as well. To Casandra’s husband and mother, Molly didn’t just “die.” She was a murder victim, in moral terms exactly as if she had been killed while nursing at her mother’s breast. But the Criminal Code contains no provision to lay such a charge, even when the killer’s actual target is the unborn child, because in law the mother and unborn child are considered one person. Olivia Talbot of Edmonton, for example, was declared the sole victim in 2005 when her unborn son Lane was purposefully killed at 27 weeks’ gestation in a hail of bullets pointed first at Olivia’s abdomen, then her head. Bill C-225 — “Molly’s law” — aims, in the words of abortion-law activist Mike Schouten, to “provide justice for women and families who have chosen to carry their babies to term.” This is not the first kick at this particular can. In 2008, MP Ken Epps private-member’s bill C-484, known by its nickname, “The Unborn Victims of Crime Act,” called for recognition of the unborn as murder victims in their own right, and passed second reading, but died when an election was called. An Environics poll at that time found 75 per cent support for the bill amongst participants. The precursor bill and the new one differ only on the margins; they are essentially the same in their intent. Predictably, a minority of women’s rights activists have condemned C-225 as they did C-484. They fear it will open the door to the criminalization of abortion, even though both bills explicitly excluded harms done to unborn babies by their mothers. Pro-choice argumentation was weak in 2008 and remains weak today. One fallacious gambit is that mother and fetus, even though each has her own unique DNA, should continue to........

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  • In December 2014 Cassandra Kaake of Windsor, Ont., was murdered in her seventh month of pregnancy, and so her already-named unborn baby Molly died as well. To Casandra’s husband and mother, Molly... (Read)
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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Unborn babies will stay persons in fact, but not in law

Posted on 2016-05-03 11:37:00

In December 2014 Cassandra Kaake of Windsor, Ont., was murdered in her seventh month of pregnancy, and so her already-named unborn baby Molly died as well. To Casandra’s husband and mother, Molly didn’t just “die.” She was a murder victim, in moral terms exactly as if she had been killed while nursing at her mother’s breast. But the Criminal Code contains no provision to lay such a charge, even when the killer’s actual target is the unborn child, because in law the mother and unborn child are considered one person. Olivia Talbot of Edmonton, for example, was declared the sole victim in 2005 when her unborn son Lane was purposefully killed at 27 weeks’ gestation in a hail of bullets pointed first at Olivia’s abdomen, then her head. Bill C-225 — “Molly’s law” — aims, in the words of abortion-law activist Mike Schouten, to “provide justice for women and families who have chosen to carry their babies to term.” This is not the first kick at this particular can. In 2008, MP Ken Epps private-member’s bill C-484, known by its nickname, “The Unborn Victims of Crime Act,” called for recognition of the unborn as murder victims in their own right, and passed second reading, but died when an election was called. An Environics poll at that time found 75 per cent support for the bill amongst participants. The precursor bill and the new one differ only on the margins; they are essentially the same in their intent. Predictably, a minority of women’s rights activists have condemned C-225 as they did C-484. They fear it will open the door to the criminalization of abortion, even though both bills explicitly excluded harms done to unborn babies by their mothers. Pro-choice argumentation was weak in 2008 and remains weak today. One fallacious gambit is that mother and fetus, even though each has her own unique DNA, should continue to........

Read Full Article