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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: There is no value in street violence, ‘cathartic’ or otherwise

Posted on 2015-04-30 10:49:03

In a conversation with Post editorialist Chris Selley, Toronto journalist Septembre Anderson reflected on the Baltimore riots following the apparently violent death of 25-year old Freddie Gray while in police custody earlier this month. Read & Debate(--image--) Find Full Comment on Facebook Anderson does not call the looting, vandalism, and fire-setting that took place “riots,” though; she calls them “a rebellion,” in a word shifting the motivation behind the creation of the chaos from negative to positive, as though blacks in Baltimore were so oppressed that no other avenue of protest was open to them. And, in words that will probably be the main takeaway for many readers and that she may come to regret, Anderson said, “I see value in that violence.” To Marxist ideologues, such a statement is old news and no big deal. To ordinary Canadians, for whom “peace, order and good government” is bred in our cultural bones, those words are uncomfortably charged. Elaborating, Anderson claims that violence is “cathartic” for people who “have no power whatsoever.” Anderson may be right that riots are cathartic for the people who indulge in them, but is it responsible to endorse such a “value”? The catharsis will be short-lived, but the damage the violence caused will have repercussions that live on. The 1967 riots in Detroit caused 43 deaths and destroyed 2,500 businesses. Perhaps the riots were “cathartic” for those who caused them. But up until then, Detroit had been a showcase city for black advancement; the rate of home ownership and employment was higher than the black national average. The riots caused middle class blacks to flee to the suburbs, and today inner-city Detroit is a basket case. Not a very good tradeoff for a minority of hotheads’ perceived need for a violent catharsis. (--image--) And really, is Baltimore’s black community so very disempowered? It could be said of Ferguson that blacks were absurdly under-represented in the corridors of........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: There is no value in street violence, ‘cathartic’ or otherwise

Posted on 2015-04-30 10:49:03

In a conversation with Post editorialist Chris Selley, Toronto journalist Septembre Anderson reflected on the Baltimore riots following the apparently violent death of 25-year old Freddie Gray while in police custody earlier this month. Read & Debate(--image--) Find Full Comment on Facebook Anderson does not call the looting, vandalism, and fire-setting that took place “riots,” though; she calls them “a rebellion,” in a word shifting the motivation behind the creation of the chaos from negative to positive, as though blacks in Baltimore were so oppressed that no other avenue of protest was open to them. And, in words that will probably be the main takeaway for many readers and that she may come to regret, Anderson said, “I see value in that violence.” To Marxist ideologues, such a statement is old news and no big deal. To ordinary Canadians, for whom “peace, order and good government” is bred in our cultural bones, those words are uncomfortably charged. Elaborating, Anderson claims that violence is “cathartic” for people who “have no power whatsoever.” Anderson may be right that riots are cathartic for the people who indulge in them, but is it responsible to endorse such a “value”? The catharsis will be short-lived, but the damage the violence caused will have repercussions that live on. The 1967 riots in Detroit caused 43 deaths and destroyed 2,500 businesses. Perhaps the riots were “cathartic” for those who caused them. But up until then, Detroit had been a showcase city for black advancement; the rate of home ownership and employment was higher than the black national average. The riots caused middle class blacks to flee to the suburbs, and today inner-city Detroit is a basket case. Not a very good tradeoff for a minority of hotheads’ perceived need for a violent catharsis. (--image--) And really, is Baltimore’s black community so very disempowered? It could be said of Ferguson that blacks were absurdly under-represented in the corridors of........

Read Full Article