"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: When kidnapping is a risk, there are ways to prepare

Posted on 2016-04-27 09:22:00

What is a government’s proper response to extortion when a human life hangs in the balance? The answer seems obvious to everyone who has no personal stake in the outcome: Don’t pay; to pay is to encourage the practice, and escalate the demands of ruthless outlaws. That is the policy of the Canadian government, and rightly so. On Monday, making good on their threat when a ransom failed to materialize, Abu Sayyaf insurgents beheaded John Ridsdel, one of 22 foreign hostages from six countries the gang was holding in the impoverished province of Sulu, about 950 kilometres south of Manila. Militants on motorcycles then dumped a bag with Ridsdel’s head inside on the streets of Jolo town. Its discovery elicited grim condemnation from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the “act of cold-blooded murder,” and a promise to work with international partners and the Phillipines government to bring the perpetrators to justice. Kidnapping is an established industry for lawless groups as a means to defray costs in the execution of their nefarious activities, and will continue. In online videos Ridsdel had been shown pleading for his life while a captor flashed a knife at his throat, before a menacing backdrop of black flags. So although the killing was a harsh disappointment, it was not unexpected, given Canada’s non-negotiation policy. This is not the first time the Canadian government has been faced with such an agonizing choice. In 2009 two Canadian diplomats, Robert Fowler, then a United Nations special envoy to Niger and his assistant Louis Guay were captured and held hostage (either by an African branch of al Qaeda or, according to Niger’s president Mamadou Tandja, by a rebel group of Tuareg nomads; it’s murky) while they were travelling in Niger. They were held for 130 days before being freed. Prime Minister Stephen Harper credited Mali and Burkina Faso for negotiating his release........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: When kidnapping is a risk, there are ways to prepare

Posted on 2016-04-27 09:22:00

What is a government’s proper response to extortion when a human life hangs in the balance? The answer seems obvious to everyone who has no personal stake in the outcome: Don’t pay; to pay is to encourage the practice, and escalate the demands of ruthless outlaws. That is the policy of the Canadian government, and rightly so. On Monday, making good on their threat when a ransom failed to materialize, Abu Sayyaf insurgents beheaded John Ridsdel, one of 22 foreign hostages from six countries the gang was holding in the impoverished province of Sulu, about 950 kilometres south of Manila. Militants on motorcycles then dumped a bag with Ridsdel’s head inside on the streets of Jolo town. Its discovery elicited grim condemnation from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau for the “act of cold-blooded murder,” and a promise to work with international partners and the Phillipines government to bring the perpetrators to justice. Kidnapping is an established industry for lawless groups as a means to defray costs in the execution of their nefarious activities, and will continue. In online videos Ridsdel had been shown pleading for his life while a captor flashed a knife at his throat, before a menacing backdrop of black flags. So although the killing was a harsh disappointment, it was not unexpected, given Canada’s non-negotiation policy. This is not the first time the Canadian government has been faced with such an agonizing choice. In 2009 two Canadian diplomats, Robert Fowler, then a United Nations special envoy to Niger and his assistant Louis Guay were captured and held hostage (either by an African branch of al Qaeda or, according to Niger’s president Mamadou Tandja, by a rebel group of Tuareg nomads; it’s murky) while they were travelling in Niger. They were held for 130 days before being freed. Prime Minister Stephen Harper credited Mali and Burkina Faso for negotiating his release........

Read Full Article