“Reason is not automatic. Those who deny it cannot be conquered by it. Do not count on them. Leave them alone.”

- Ayn Rand
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Sophie’s Choice comes to life

Posted on 2014-10-17 09:58:52

By any standard, 14-year old Gracie Attard, an English girl from the tiny Maltese island of Gozo, is an extraordinary child: bright, charming, poised, with ambitions for a career in medicine. She has also been saved twice from certain death: the first time by her parents’ religious principles, the second time from her parents’ religious principles. In 2000, Gracie was born a conjoined twin. Her sister Rosie, with whom she shared an aorta, bladder and circulatory system, was a “parasitical” twin, incapable of living independently. Rosie’s burgeoning needs, doctors predicted, would eventually kill Gracie. The decision was made to separate the twins. The case, recalled to public attention through a first-ever interview last week with Gracie in the Daily Mail — “I don’t feel guilty that I lived and [Rosie] died, because what happened wasn’t my decision” — is surely unique in human history. Nature plays some very cruel tricks on human beings in the process of species reproduction. Miscarriages, infertility and birth deficits are misfortunes that evoke uncomplicated sympathy. But the cruelest trick of all, physical fusion, evokes a much stronger response; sympathy is submerged in revulsion bordering on horror. Here, if anywhere, is comeuppance to the old dictum, “Nothing human is alien to me.” RelatedOnce-conjoined twin girls make public debut in PhiladelphiaConjoined Palestinian twins who share heart, liver can’t be separated, say Israeli doctors We can empathize with the physical and social challenges to a handicapped child, and we willingly try to understand what happens inside the mind of an autistic child. But we cannot even begin to imagine enduring the torture of hopeless fusion without going mad. Only the conjoined themselves, ignorant of the normal human estate, can — and do — accommodate themselves with equanimity to their dreadful lot. Since the 1950s, surgeons have whenever possible separated conjoined twins, however long and arduous the process.........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Sophie’s Choice comes to life

Posted on 2014-10-17 09:58:52

By any standard, 14-year old Gracie Attard, an English girl from the tiny Maltese island of Gozo, is an extraordinary child: bright, charming, poised, with ambitions for a career in medicine. She has also been saved twice from certain death: the first time by her parents’ religious principles, the second time from her parents’ religious principles. In 2000, Gracie was born a conjoined twin. Her sister Rosie, with whom she shared an aorta, bladder and circulatory system, was a “parasitical” twin, incapable of living independently. Rosie’s burgeoning needs, doctors predicted, would eventually kill Gracie. The decision was made to separate the twins. The case, recalled to public attention through a first-ever interview last week with Gracie in the Daily Mail — “I don’t feel guilty that I lived and [Rosie] died, because what happened wasn’t my decision” — is surely unique in human history. Nature plays some very cruel tricks on human beings in the process of species reproduction. Miscarriages, infertility and birth deficits are misfortunes that evoke uncomplicated sympathy. But the cruelest trick of all, physical fusion, evokes a much stronger response; sympathy is submerged in revulsion bordering on horror. Here, if anywhere, is comeuppance to the old dictum, “Nothing human is alien to me.” RelatedOnce-conjoined twin girls make public debut in PhiladelphiaConjoined Palestinian twins who share heart, liver can’t be separated, say Israeli doctors We can empathize with the physical and social challenges to a handicapped child, and we willingly try to understand what happens inside the mind of an autistic child. But we cannot even begin to imagine enduring the torture of hopeless fusion without going mad. Only the conjoined themselves, ignorant of the normal human estate, can — and do — accommodate themselves with equanimity to their dreadful lot. Since the 1950s, surgeons have whenever possible separated conjoined twins, however long and arduous the process.........

Read Full Article