"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: When reaching out to the Muslim community, choose your ambassadors carefully

Posted on 2016-11-29 14:00:00

Crime Prevention Ottawa (CPO) was founded in 2004 to develop strategies for enhancing community safety, addressing problems like violence against women, neighbourhood gangs, abuse of the disabled and hate crimes.   Between January and November of this year, according to Staff Sergeant Dave Zackrias of the Diversity and Race Relations Unit (DRR) of the Ottawa Police Service (OPS), there have been 64 reported hate incidents targeting blacks, LGBT, Jews and Muslims. The majority were “mischief,” mostly graffiti of offensive words and symbols, or “harassment,” shouted or Internet hate speech. Notably, there were very few reports of two or more people engaging in a verbal confrontation. There were two cases of physical assault. Altogether hate crimes constituted a virtually violence-free 0.02 per cent of all Ottawa police-reported crimes. To an epidemiologist these figures would indicate a basically healthy and inclusive society. And yet, in spite of their proportionately low numbers, of the four public events CPO mounted in 2016, two have been dedicated to hate crimes, with both, unfortunately, featuring a failure of due diligence regarding Muslim representation. Related Ottawa police arrest young offender allegedly responsible for series of swastika tags on Jewish sites Barbara Kay: The deplorables’ get their moment. Break out the pointed hoods Barbara Kay: A Marxist revolution by alt-left millennials? On June 15, CPO organized a public education program, “Why Faith-Based Crime Prevention Matters,” with a panel of two Christians and one Muslim. No Jewish representation, even though Jews, one third as numerous as Muslims in Canada, are eight times more likely to be targets of faith-related hate than Muslims. The Muslim panelist was Imam Zijad Delic, a poor choice. Delic’s scheduled 2010 appearance at the Department of........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: When reaching out to the Muslim community, choose your ambassadors carefully

Posted on 2016-11-29 14:00:00

Crime Prevention Ottawa (CPO) was founded in 2004 to develop strategies for enhancing community safety, addressing problems like violence against women, neighbourhood gangs, abuse of the disabled and hate crimes.   Between January and November of this year, according to Staff Sergeant Dave Zackrias of the Diversity and Race Relations Unit (DRR) of the Ottawa Police Service (OPS), there have been 64 reported hate incidents targeting blacks, LGBT, Jews and Muslims. The majority were “mischief,” mostly graffiti of offensive words and symbols, or “harassment,” shouted or Internet hate speech. Notably, there were very few reports of two or more people engaging in a verbal confrontation. There were two cases of physical assault. Altogether hate crimes constituted a virtually violence-free 0.02 per cent of all Ottawa police-reported crimes. To an epidemiologist these figures would indicate a basically healthy and inclusive society. And yet, in spite of their proportionately low numbers, of the four public events CPO mounted in 2016, two have been dedicated to hate crimes, with both, unfortunately, featuring a failure of due diligence regarding Muslim representation. Related Ottawa police arrest young offender allegedly responsible for series of swastika tags on Jewish sites Barbara Kay: The deplorables’ get their moment. Break out the pointed hoods Barbara Kay: A Marxist revolution by alt-left millennials? On June 15, CPO organized a public education program, “Why Faith-Based Crime Prevention Matters,” with a panel of two Christians and one Muslim. No Jewish representation, even though Jews, one third as numerous as Muslims in Canada, are eight times more likely to be targets of faith-related hate than Muslims. The Muslim panelist was Imam Zijad Delic, a poor choice. Delic’s scheduled 2010 appearance at the Department of........

Read Full Article