"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Scandal at CAMH — one entirely of its own making

Posted on 2016-02-03 06:20:19

CAMH — Toronto’s prestigious Centre for Addiction and Mental Health — now finds itself where no publicly-funded institution wants to be: sitting in the glare of a media spotlight focused on a controversy entirely of its own making. Until last December, CAMH’s Youth and Family Identity Clinic (GIC) helped young children with gender dysphoria explore their mental relationship with their bodies and often, through whole-family therapy, enabled them to reunite with their biological reality. Even 10 years ago, such an outcome would be considered a success story. But, thanks to aggressive activism in the trans movement, today any interventions to prevent gender transitioning in children is deemed by LGBT loyalists — and increasingly by legislators — as insensitive or even abusive. Ontario’s 2015 Bill 77, for example, bans funding for “any services rendered that seek to change or direct the sexual orientation or gender identity of a patient, including efforts to change or direct the patient’s behaviour or gender expression.” In mid-December, in a double whammy, CAMH announced that the GIC was “winding down” its four-decades service to the community, and that Dr. Kenneth Zucker, GIC’s team leader and an acknowledged academic star in his field, had been let go. Zucker had for years been the target of venomous attacks by activists for practicing what they consider “conversion therapy” — the discredited practice of attempting to turn gays straight — which isn’t the case, as Zucker has always been fully supportive of gender transitioning in cases where intervention is unwarranted. But the prevailing emotionalism on the subject has trumped rational dialogue. CAMH’s decision was received with jubilation by trans activists as a victory for the movement. RelatedAs trans issues become mainstream, question of how to address variant gender expression comes to forefront Supporters of Zucker agree that the GIC closing and Zucker’s dismissal were politically inspired........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Scandal at CAMH — one entirely of its own making

Posted on 2016-02-03 06:20:19

CAMH — Toronto’s prestigious Centre for Addiction and Mental Health — now finds itself where no publicly-funded institution wants to be: sitting in the glare of a media spotlight focused on a controversy entirely of its own making. Until last December, CAMH’s Youth and Family Identity Clinic (GIC) helped young children with gender dysphoria explore their mental relationship with their bodies and often, through whole-family therapy, enabled them to reunite with their biological reality. Even 10 years ago, such an outcome would be considered a success story. But, thanks to aggressive activism in the trans movement, today any interventions to prevent gender transitioning in children is deemed by LGBT loyalists — and increasingly by legislators — as insensitive or even abusive. Ontario’s 2015 Bill 77, for example, bans funding for “any services rendered that seek to change or direct the sexual orientation or gender identity of a patient, including efforts to change or direct the patient’s behaviour or gender expression.” In mid-December, in a double whammy, CAMH announced that the GIC was “winding down” its four-decades service to the community, and that Dr. Kenneth Zucker, GIC’s team leader and an acknowledged academic star in his field, had been let go. Zucker had for years been the target of venomous attacks by activists for practicing what they consider “conversion therapy” — the discredited practice of attempting to turn gays straight — which isn’t the case, as Zucker has always been fully supportive of gender transitioning in cases where intervention is unwarranted. But the prevailing emotionalism on the subject has trumped rational dialogue. CAMH’s decision was received with jubilation by trans activists as a victory for the movement. RelatedAs trans issues become mainstream, question of how to address variant gender expression comes to forefront Supporters of Zucker agree that the GIC closing and Zucker’s dismissal were politically inspired........

Read Full Article