"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Israel’s victory over drought

Posted on 2016-09-20 16:29:01

I am grateful to have been born in Canada, and for a multitude of reasons, not least because we control most of the world’s fresh water.  Water shortages can and do lead to wars. Wars create refugees. Drought creates migrants. We’ve already seen a preview in the Middle East of what could happen on a larger scale. A decade-long drought (reportedly the worst in 900 years) had by 2008 brought Syria to the lip of catastrophe. In the Euphrates River valley, farmers were drilling wells 30, 60 and finally 490 metres down, literally to the bottom. The wells ran dry and huge tracts of farmland were put out of commission. Iraq, Iran and Jordan all face similar potential water catastrophes.  The situation in Israel was grim as well. The Sea of Galilee, its biggest fresh-water source, had dropped to within centimetres of what is called the “black line” of irreversible salt infiltration. Farmers lost a year’s crops. It hadn’t helped that Israel had been a leader in water conservation for years, with water treatment systems recapturing 86 per cent of used water for irrigation (the second most efficient country, Spain, recaptures 19 per cent), and numerous desalination plants providing 55 per cent of its domestic-use water. It wasn’t enough to stave off a 500-million-cubic metre shortfall. Today, a scant eight years on, Israel has more potable water than it knows what to do with. RelatedLawrence Solomon: Water exports and free markets don’t mixFather Raymond J. de Souza: Jacob’s sheep make aliyah Meet Sorek, 16 kilometres south of Tel Aviv, Israel’s newest and the world’s largest reverse-osmosis desalination facility: two sand-filled concrete reservoirs as big as football fields and constantly filtering water pumped from the Mediterranean through them via a gushing pipe big enough for an adult man to stand in. From the reservoirs, the water goes to a vast hangar where it provides enough drinking water for 1.5 million Israelis — and........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Israel’s victory over drought

Posted on 2016-09-20 16:29:01

I am grateful to have been born in Canada, and for a multitude of reasons, not least because we control most of the world’s fresh water.  Water shortages can and do lead to wars. Wars create refugees. Drought creates migrants. We’ve already seen a preview in the Middle East of what could happen on a larger scale. A decade-long drought (reportedly the worst in 900 years) had by 2008 brought Syria to the lip of catastrophe. In the Euphrates River valley, farmers were drilling wells 30, 60 and finally 490 metres down, literally to the bottom. The wells ran dry and huge tracts of farmland were put out of commission. Iraq, Iran and Jordan all face similar potential water catastrophes.  The situation in Israel was grim as well. The Sea of Galilee, its biggest fresh-water source, had dropped to within centimetres of what is called the “black line” of irreversible salt infiltration. Farmers lost a year’s crops. It hadn’t helped that Israel had been a leader in water conservation for years, with water treatment systems recapturing 86 per cent of used water for irrigation (the second most efficient country, Spain, recaptures 19 per cent), and numerous desalination plants providing 55 per cent of its domestic-use water. It wasn’t enough to stave off a 500-million-cubic metre shortfall. Today, a scant eight years on, Israel has more potable water than it knows what to do with. RelatedLawrence Solomon: Water exports and free markets don’t mixFather Raymond J. de Souza: Jacob’s sheep make aliyah Meet Sorek, 16 kilometres south of Tel Aviv, Israel’s newest and the world’s largest reverse-osmosis desalination facility: two sand-filled concrete reservoirs as big as football fields and constantly filtering water pumped from the Mediterranean through them via a gushing pipe big enough for an adult man to stand in. From the reservoirs, the water goes to a vast hangar where it provides enough drinking water for 1.5 million Israelis — and........

Read Full Article