"The central conservative truth is that it is culture, not politics, that determines the success of a society.
The central liberal truth is that politics can change a culture and save it from itself."
- Daniel Patrick Moynihan
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Michael Ondaatje and the PEN Six get it horribly wrong

Posted on 2015-04-27 15:15:09

PEN international, a non-political organization now represented in 150 countries, was founded in 1921. Its mandate is to promote literature and support freedom of expression. PEN Canada joined up in 1926 and today boasts a membership of more than a 1,000 writers and supporters, including cultural luminaries such as Margaret Atwood, Adrienne Clarkson, John Ralston Saul, Charles Foran and David Cronenberg. PEN does good work, advocating for imprisoned writers in repressive regimes like Iran and Turkey and, through their Canadian Issues Committee, monitoring legislation that might violate the Canadian Charter with regard to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech means the freedom to offend, even deeply offend, anyone or any group whose words or actions are offensive to the speaker. On May 5, at a New York gala scheduled to coincide with PEN’s annual World Voices Festival, which attracts many international writers, PEN American Center will award its annual Freedom of Expression Courage award to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in front of some 800 writers, publishers and supporters. The award will be accepted by Gerard Biard, Charlie Hebdo’s editor in chief, absent on the fatal January day when 12 staff members were massacred by Islamic jihadists, and Jean-Baptiste Thoret, a staff member whose late arrival saved his life. As a response to that decision, six writers are boycotting the gala, including Canada’s Michael Ondaatje, who had been scheduled to serve as a host. Rachel Kushner said she was withdrawing out of discomfort with the magazine’s “cultural intolerance”; novelist Peter Carey complained of PEN’s “seeming blindness to the cultural arrogance of the French nation, which does not recognize its moral obligation to a large and disempowered segment of their population.” Others reinforced the general focus on  “disenfranchised” Muslims, even though, as many observers have pointed out, Charlie Hebdo’s admittedly vicious satires did not spare any........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Michael Ondaatje and the PEN Six get it horribly wrong

Posted on 2015-04-27 15:15:09

PEN international, a non-political organization now represented in 150 countries, was founded in 1921. Its mandate is to promote literature and support freedom of expression. PEN Canada joined up in 1926 and today boasts a membership of more than a 1,000 writers and supporters, including cultural luminaries such as Margaret Atwood, Adrienne Clarkson, John Ralston Saul, Charles Foran and David Cronenberg. PEN does good work, advocating for imprisoned writers in repressive regimes like Iran and Turkey and, through their Canadian Issues Committee, monitoring legislation that might violate the Canadian Charter with regard to freedom of speech. Freedom of speech means the freedom to offend, even deeply offend, anyone or any group whose words or actions are offensive to the speaker. On May 5, at a New York gala scheduled to coincide with PEN’s annual World Voices Festival, which attracts many international writers, PEN American Center will award its annual Freedom of Expression Courage award to the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo in front of some 800 writers, publishers and supporters. The award will be accepted by Gerard Biard, Charlie Hebdo’s editor in chief, absent on the fatal January day when 12 staff members were massacred by Islamic jihadists, and Jean-Baptiste Thoret, a staff member whose late arrival saved his life. As a response to that decision, six writers are boycotting the gala, including Canada’s Michael Ondaatje, who had been scheduled to serve as a host. Rachel Kushner said she was withdrawing out of discomfort with the magazine’s “cultural intolerance”; novelist Peter Carey complained of PEN’s “seeming blindness to the cultural arrogance of the French nation, which does not recognize its moral obligation to a large and disempowered segment of their population.” Others reinforced the general focus on  “disenfranchised” Muslims, even though, as many observers have pointed out, Charlie Hebdo’s admittedly vicious satires did not spare any........

Read Full Article