"We begin our public affections in our families...We pass on to our neighbourhoods and our habitual provincial connections. These are inns and resting places.."

- Edmund Burke, from Reflections on the revolution in France
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Kahnawake’s ‘marry out, stay out’ policy is about survival, not race

Posted on 2015-05-27 07:53:00

In 1984 the Mohawk community of Kahnawake came up with a controversial membership law that bans all “mixed race” couples from living on its Montreal-area territory. Violation of the policy may result in eviction and/or the cutting off of benefits. The Supreme Court of Canada is to rule on whether or not Mohawk woman Waneek Horn-Miller and six other plaintiffs were deprived of their Charter rights in the last year after being ordered to leave Kahnawake because they are married/partnered to whites. Amongst other observers, the National Post editorial board is appalled by the policy. Inspired by a new incident, that of native Amanda Deer and her white boyfriend being driven from the reserve, their May 21 editorial stated that “in 2015, consenting adults should be able to take up residence with whomever they please, even if that residence happens to be on reserve.” The policy is indeed race-based. But it is not inspired by racism, which implies hatred or contempt for others. The Mohawks are not denouncing intermarriage in itself (so the title for the editorial, “The town that bans interracial marriage” is therefore misleading). They do not hate white people or consider them inferior. They have no problem with Mohawks married to white people living elsewhere. National survival is the issue. As I understand it, the Mohawks consider a policy under which intermarried couples enjoy the same rights as racially pure Mohawk couples will encourage more intermarriage, eventually resulting in a community so racially diluted that it will lose its cultural character and its raison d’être. As Kahnawake Mohawk Chief Michael Delisle said last fall: “All we are trying to do is preserve, not only culture and language and identity, but who we are as a people.” Well, he has a point. And it is a point that has been recognized as legitimate. Quebec’s Bill 101, which actively........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Kahnawake’s ‘marry out, stay out’ policy is about survival, not race

Posted on 2015-05-27 07:53:00

In 1984 the Mohawk community of Kahnawake came up with a controversial membership law that bans all “mixed race” couples from living on its Montreal-area territory. Violation of the policy may result in eviction and/or the cutting off of benefits. The Supreme Court of Canada is to rule on whether or not Mohawk woman Waneek Horn-Miller and six other plaintiffs were deprived of their Charter rights in the last year after being ordered to leave Kahnawake because they are married/partnered to whites. Amongst other observers, the National Post editorial board is appalled by the policy. Inspired by a new incident, that of native Amanda Deer and her white boyfriend being driven from the reserve, their May 21 editorial stated that “in 2015, consenting adults should be able to take up residence with whomever they please, even if that residence happens to be on reserve.” The policy is indeed race-based. But it is not inspired by racism, which implies hatred or contempt for others. The Mohawks are not denouncing intermarriage in itself (so the title for the editorial, “The town that bans interracial marriage” is therefore misleading). They do not hate white people or consider them inferior. They have no problem with Mohawks married to white people living elsewhere. National survival is the issue. As I understand it, the Mohawks consider a policy under which intermarried couples enjoy the same rights as racially pure Mohawk couples will encourage more intermarriage, eventually resulting in a community so racially diluted that it will lose its cultural character and its raison d’être. As Kahnawake Mohawk Chief Michael Delisle said last fall: “All we are trying to do is preserve, not only culture and language and identity, but who we are as a people.” Well, he has a point. And it is a point that has been recognized as legitimate. Quebec’s Bill 101, which actively........

Read Full Article