“There are three infallible signs of the 'crank'...The first is that he has a theory about the Jews. The second is that he has a theory about money. And the third is that he has a theory about Shakespeare."

- Joseph Bottum
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

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Barbara Kay: Chinese signs, native ‘medicine,’ niqabbed women — a busy week on the multicultural front

Posted on 2014-10-22 06:40:06

On the multiculturalist front, there was no dearth of news and opinionating this week. One news item deserves mention simply because the attached opinion was so breathtakingly wrong, a product of the extreme political correctness that inhibits rational thought where aboriginal culture is concerned (and justly condemned as such in the National Post’s Monday editorial). Jason Kenney defends his 2011 decision to ban wearing of niqabs during citizenship oathsOTTAWA – Jason Kenney took to Twitter on Friday to defend directives forbidding Muslim women from wearing niqabs while taking the oath of citizenship. “I believe people taking the public oath of citizenship should do so publicly, w/ their faces uncovered,” Mr. Kenney, who issued the directives as immigration minister and is now employment and social development minister. He asked his 35,700 Twitter followers if they agreed with his stance. The tweet came amid an ongoing lawsuit over the ban against the federal government. Zunera Ishaq, a Pakistani woman now living in Mississauga, Ont., is suing the Conservatives, arguing the ban violates her Charter rights by failing to accommodate her religious beliefs. Continue reading… At a court hearing regarding the medical treatment of an 11-year old aboriginal girl with an acute form of leukemia — whose principal hope for cure lies with chemotherapy, but who pins her hopes on native placebos — an Ontario judge mused that a child’s life might be an acceptable price to pay for collective self-esteem. That, at least, is my interpretation of: “Maybe First Nations culture doesn’t require every child to be treated with chemotherapy and to survive for that culture to have value” (my emphasis). What is the treatment for Multicultural Derangement Syndrome? This judge needs it — quick. The second story concerns language rights in the densely Chinese-Canadian city of Richmond, B.C. Many Chinese-language storeowners advertise their wares in Chinese only. A few activists........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Chinese signs, native ‘medicine,’ niqabbed women — a busy week on the multicultural front

Posted on 2014-10-22 06:40:06

On the multiculturalist front, there was no dearth of news and opinionating this week. One news item deserves mention simply because the attached opinion was so breathtakingly wrong, a product of the extreme political correctness that inhibits rational thought where aboriginal culture is concerned (and justly condemned as such in the National Post’s Monday editorial). Jason Kenney defends his 2011 decision to ban wearing of niqabs during citizenship oathsOTTAWA – Jason Kenney took to Twitter on Friday to defend directives forbidding Muslim women from wearing niqabs while taking the oath of citizenship. “I believe people taking the public oath of citizenship should do so publicly, w/ their faces uncovered,” Mr. Kenney, who issued the directives as immigration minister and is now employment and social development minister. He asked his 35,700 Twitter followers if they agreed with his stance. The tweet came amid an ongoing lawsuit over the ban against the federal government. Zunera Ishaq, a Pakistani woman now living in Mississauga, Ont., is suing the Conservatives, arguing the ban violates her Charter rights by failing to accommodate her religious beliefs. Continue reading… At a court hearing regarding the medical treatment of an 11-year old aboriginal girl with an acute form of leukemia — whose principal hope for cure lies with chemotherapy, but who pins her hopes on native placebos — an Ontario judge mused that a child’s life might be an acceptable price to pay for collective self-esteem. That, at least, is my interpretation of: “Maybe First Nations culture doesn’t require every child to be treated with chemotherapy and to survive for that culture to have value” (my emphasis). What is the treatment for Multicultural Derangement Syndrome? This judge needs it — quick. The second story concerns language rights in the densely Chinese-Canadian city of Richmond, B.C. Many Chinese-language storeowners advertise their wares in Chinese only. A few activists........

Read Full Article