"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Actually, one needn’t be a hysterical bigot to have concerns with M-103

Posted on 2017-02-21 15:03:11

I have serious concerns about M-103, a private member’s motion currently before Parliament that would condemn Islamophobia. But I want to reassure my colleague Andrew Coyne that I’m not nearly as unhinged as he seems to think we critics are. Here is what Andrew wrote of the critics in his recent column on M-103: they’re a “most extreme voice” on “a most extreme position,” flaunting “a kind of moral exhibitionism” and “populist virtue-signaling,” with the purpose of “say(ing) and do(ing) the most intolerant or ill-considered thing that comes to mind.” Further, they’re “whip(ping)” up a “hysteria campaign.” The case against M-103 is actually much simpler, and one need not be hysterical to make it. M-103 is troubling for its lack of definition and in particular to its deference to language in petition E-411, which M-103 cites as its raison d’étre, to wit: “Recently an infinitesimally small number of extremist individuals have conducted terrorist activities while claiming to speak for the religion of Islam… These violent individuals do not reflect in any way the values or the teachings of the religion of Islam. In fact, they misrepresent the religion. We categorically reject all their activities. They in no way represent the religion, the beliefs and the desire of Muslims to co-exist in peace with all peoples of the world.” RelatedAndrew Coyne: Free speech needs to be guided by judgment and conscience, not rulesBarbara Kay: How long until my honest criticism of Islamism constitutes a speech crime in Canada?Growing group of Tory leadership hopefuls oppose move to have House of Commons denounce Islamophobia Andrew Coyne: Hysteria from Conservatives over harmless motion on Islamophobia Conservatism used to have some claim to being a coherent political philosophy. Of late it has become a series of dares. The most extreme voice will lay down the most extreme position, then challenge others to........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Actually, one needn’t be a hysterical bigot to have concerns with M-103

Posted on 2017-02-21 15:03:11

I have serious concerns about M-103, a private member’s motion currently before Parliament that would condemn Islamophobia. But I want to reassure my colleague Andrew Coyne that I’m not nearly as unhinged as he seems to think we critics are. Here is what Andrew wrote of the critics in his recent column on M-103: they’re a “most extreme voice” on “a most extreme position,” flaunting “a kind of moral exhibitionism” and “populist virtue-signaling,” with the purpose of “say(ing) and do(ing) the most intolerant or ill-considered thing that comes to mind.” Further, they’re “whip(ping)” up a “hysteria campaign.” The case against M-103 is actually much simpler, and one need not be hysterical to make it. M-103 is troubling for its lack of definition and in particular to its deference to language in petition E-411, which M-103 cites as its raison d’étre, to wit: “Recently an infinitesimally small number of extremist individuals have conducted terrorist activities while claiming to speak for the religion of Islam… These violent individuals do not reflect in any way the values or the teachings of the religion of Islam. In fact, they misrepresent the religion. We categorically reject all their activities. They in no way represent the religion, the beliefs and the desire of Muslims to co-exist in peace with all peoples of the world.” RelatedAndrew Coyne: Free speech needs to be guided by judgment and conscience, not rulesBarbara Kay: How long until my honest criticism of Islamism constitutes a speech crime in Canada?Growing group of Tory leadership hopefuls oppose move to have House of Commons denounce Islamophobia Andrew Coyne: Hysteria from Conservatives over harmless motion on Islamophobia Conservatism used to have some claim to being a coherent political philosophy. Of late it has become a series of dares. The most extreme voice will lay down the most extreme position, then challenge others to........

Read Full Article