"Religion is a paramount aspect of human culture. Religious need cannot be ex-communicated from culture by rationalist incantation. Man does not live by reason alone."

- Polish philosopher Leszek Kolakowski, 1927-2009
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: A reprieve from holiday gift-buying anxiety

Posted on 2014-12-17 08:00:30

I do not love buying gifts. That’s an understatement. Shopping for others brings on a feeling of creeping paralysis that is quite unsettling. Department stores are the worst. It seems that the greater the selection, the scarcer the sales clerks. My challenge is to find and buy something before I am compelled to flee lest I turn to stone. Buying gifts for grandchildren is no easier than for adults (I don’t count books as gifts). I am happier now that my grandchildren are getting older and have strong opinions on what they want for Hannukah. The other day, as per my request, my oldest Toronto granddaughter — now 10 — emailed me a list of what she and her two sisters wanted, with links directly to the products thoughtfully provided (not even close to the settled limit I had given her, for which they got brownie points). In mere moments I had purchased the designated Batman costume and the American Girl make-up kit, and sent them on their way. O brave new shopping world that was made for lazy and unimaginative souls like me. It doesn’t seem right to have gifts delivered to my grandchildren here in Montreal, though. Luckily, my Montreal six-year old, Noa, who is all about feminine charm, princesses and sparkly self-enhancement, announced she had finally gotten permission to have her ears pierced. So this year’s Hannukah gift was a no-brainer. I told her that I would accompany her and her mother to the ear-piercing ceremony and then on to The Bay for her first pair of real earrings. This offer was accepted with genuine excitement. Since Noa would be doing the choosing and my daughter the driving (I also suffer from parking-availability anxiety), I felt none of my customary dread as the big shopping day approached. The piercee is attended by two piercers at the same time, so both the excruciating anticipation of the pain and the pain itself are halved. Ear-piercing is a serious rite of passage for girls. In the old days, you just dropped in to a jewellery store in........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: A reprieve from holiday gift-buying anxiety

Posted on 2014-12-17 08:00:30

I do not love buying gifts. That’s an understatement. Shopping for others brings on a feeling of creeping paralysis that is quite unsettling. Department stores are the worst. It seems that the greater the selection, the scarcer the sales clerks. My challenge is to find and buy something before I am compelled to flee lest I turn to stone. Buying gifts for grandchildren is no easier than for adults (I don’t count books as gifts). I am happier now that my grandchildren are getting older and have strong opinions on what they want for Hannukah. The other day, as per my request, my oldest Toronto granddaughter — now 10 — emailed me a list of what she and her two sisters wanted, with links directly to the products thoughtfully provided (not even close to the settled limit I had given her, for which they got brownie points). In mere moments I had purchased the designated Batman costume and the American Girl make-up kit, and sent them on their way. O brave new shopping world that was made for lazy and unimaginative souls like me. It doesn’t seem right to have gifts delivered to my grandchildren here in Montreal, though. Luckily, my Montreal six-year old, Noa, who is all about feminine charm, princesses and sparkly self-enhancement, announced she had finally gotten permission to have her ears pierced. So this year’s Hannukah gift was a no-brainer. I told her that I would accompany her and her mother to the ear-piercing ceremony and then on to The Bay for her first pair of real earrings. This offer was accepted with genuine excitement. Since Noa would be doing the choosing and my daughter the driving (I also suffer from parking-availability anxiety), I felt none of my customary dread as the big shopping day approached. The piercee is attended by two piercers at the same time, so both the excruciating anticipation of the pain and the pain itself are halved. Ear-piercing is a serious rite of passage for girls. In the old days, you just dropped in to a jewellery store in........

Read Full Article