"To be attached to the subdivision, to love the little platoon we belong to in society, is the first principle (the germ as it were) of public affections. [The little platoon] is the first link in the series by which we proceed towards a love to our country and to mankind."

- Edmund Burke, from Reflections on the revolution in France
The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

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Barbara Kay: Ontario’s new sex ed curriculum teaches young children too much, too soon

Posted on 2015-02-24 12:49:29

In Ecclesiastes it is written, “There is a time for everything, and a season for everything under the sun … a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing. …” One does not have to be Christian or even religious to appreciate the anger that fuelled objections in the first go-around of the Ontario sex ed debate in 2009, enough to block its launch. It is bubbling up anew as the province’s Ministry of Education finally launches the program, virtually unchanged from its first incarnation. I am neither Christian nor religious, and I don’t like it at all. I have three objections to the curriculum. The first is that it introduces advanced material too early, before children are psychologically ready to absorb it; the second is that it teaches details of intimate behaviour to children in a group that is best conveyed one-on-one or through texts a child can read alone; and the third is that the course teaches sex as behaviour that is detached from any moral component (apart from the responsibility not to spread disease or get pregnant). Normally in children, between the ages of six to 12, known as the “latency period,” sexual energies fall dormant. It is because they are undistracted by sexuality in these years that children are optimally educable in the areas crucial to cultural growth: literacy, maths, history and science. RelatedRead Ontario’s new sex ed curriculum for yourselfMarni Soupcoff: The worst part about Ontario’s new sex-ed program has nothing to do with sex Only at adolescence do hormonal changes create the appropriate psychological context for absorbing ideas about “gender identity” and sexual ethics in a meaningful light. During the latency period, children should be taught simple human biology as part of their science program: i.e. how our bodies function, how babies are made, and that’s it. There is no need to get into the intricacies and variety of sexual desire at this stage. What is the value of learning sexual details........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Ontario’s new sex ed curriculum teaches young children too much, too soon

Posted on 2015-02-24 12:49:29

In Ecclesiastes it is written, “There is a time for everything, and a season for everything under the sun … a time to embrace and a time to refrain from embracing. …” One does not have to be Christian or even religious to appreciate the anger that fuelled objections in the first go-around of the Ontario sex ed debate in 2009, enough to block its launch. It is bubbling up anew as the province’s Ministry of Education finally launches the program, virtually unchanged from its first incarnation. I am neither Christian nor religious, and I don’t like it at all. I have three objections to the curriculum. The first is that it introduces advanced material too early, before children are psychologically ready to absorb it; the second is that it teaches details of intimate behaviour to children in a group that is best conveyed one-on-one or through texts a child can read alone; and the third is that the course teaches sex as behaviour that is detached from any moral component (apart from the responsibility not to spread disease or get pregnant). Normally in children, between the ages of six to 12, known as the “latency period,” sexual energies fall dormant. It is because they are undistracted by sexuality in these years that children are optimally educable in the areas crucial to cultural growth: literacy, maths, history and science. RelatedRead Ontario’s new sex ed curriculum for yourselfMarni Soupcoff: The worst part about Ontario’s new sex-ed program has nothing to do with sex Only at adolescence do hormonal changes create the appropriate psychological context for absorbing ideas about “gender identity” and sexual ethics in a meaningful light. During the latency period, children should be taught simple human biology as part of their science program: i.e. how our bodies function, how babies are made, and that’s it. There is no need to get into the intricacies and variety of sexual desire at this stage. What is the value of learning sexual details........

Read Full Article