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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Wasted tax dollars on a values-void novel

Posted on 2015-01-21 06:30:57

Every year, as a recipient of the Governor-General’s award for best fiction in children’s literature, a lucky Canadian writer receives a $25,000 cash prize. This year Raziel Reid, creator of pop culture blog Blitz & Shitz on DailyXtra.com, won for his Young Adult novel, When Everything Feels like the Movies. I’ve read the novel. What were they thinking? No, seriously, what were their criteria? If I were an awards committee member, I’d lean to a recognizably Canadian novel in which the protagonist’s struggles to emerge from conflict lead to self-knowledge and the promise of positive maturation. Knowing children tend to “read up” — younger children like books about older children — I’d reject works whose themes and language were inappropriate for the lowest age of their category (here 12-18). That I wasn’t a committee member will be immediately apparent to anyone who peruses Reid’s novel. When Everything Feels like the Movies is about a trans/queer teenager — Jude (or “Judy”) Rothesay — whose difference isolates him socially. But he has many other troubles besides. His mother is an alcoholic stripper, so absorbed in a mutually abusive, on-off relationship with her loutish partner that she has difficulty parenting Jude and his special-needs half-brother Keefer. His father is but a rare, fleeting presence. RelatedJordan Tannahill, Thomas King, Jillian Tamaki win English Language Governor General’s Literary Awards The central motif of this memoir-style novel is the “mirror,” specifically movies, a kind of mirror that silvers over sordid reality with glamour and fame. Jude describes everything that happens to him in cinematic terms. His middle school is a movie set. “No one was real. Especially me. We were all just playing our parts.” His peers fall into one of three categories: “The Crew”— kids engaged in school life, who participate in sports and extracurricular activities; “The Extras” — “the misfits, outcasts and social rejects”; and “The Movie Stars,”........

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  • Every year, as a recipient of the Governor-General’s award for best fiction in children’s literature, a lucky Canadian writer receives a $25,000 cash prize. This year Raziel Reid, creator of pop culture blog Blitz... (Read)
  • Note: Readers incapable of appreciating parody should stop reading now. The University of Ottawa released two landmark studies this week that are likely to shake public perceptions of common human behaviours. In one,... (Read)
  • Last week University of Ottawa president Allan Rock announced the Gee-Gees men’s hockey team would not be allowed to participate in the 2015-16 season. It would appear that the whole team is paying a collective price... (Read)
  • In his Jan 14 column in the National Post, Andrew Coyne tackles the much-debated topic of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons that deeply offend adherents of all three of the Abrahamic faiths, some of which – the... (Read)
  • It was with a great sigh of relief that all right-thinking Quebecers saw the PQ crash and burn in last spring’s election. The authors of their own defeat, the PQ’s primary strategy had been, via a “values” charter,... (Read)
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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Wasted tax dollars on a values-void novel

Posted on 2015-01-21 06:30:57

Every year, as a recipient of the Governor-General’s award for best fiction in children’s literature, a lucky Canadian writer receives a $25,000 cash prize. This year Raziel Reid, creator of pop culture blog Blitz & Shitz on DailyXtra.com, won for his Young Adult novel, When Everything Feels like the Movies. I’ve read the novel. What were they thinking? No, seriously, what were their criteria? If I were an awards committee member, I’d lean to a recognizably Canadian novel in which the protagonist’s struggles to emerge from conflict lead to self-knowledge and the promise of positive maturation. Knowing children tend to “read up” — younger children like books about older children — I’d reject works whose themes and language were inappropriate for the lowest age of their category (here 12-18). That I wasn’t a committee member will be immediately apparent to anyone who peruses Reid’s novel. When Everything Feels like the Movies is about a trans/queer teenager — Jude (or “Judy”) Rothesay — whose difference isolates him socially. But he has many other troubles besides. His mother is an alcoholic stripper, so absorbed in a mutually abusive, on-off relationship with her loutish partner that she has difficulty parenting Jude and his special-needs half-brother Keefer. His father is but a rare, fleeting presence. RelatedJordan Tannahill, Thomas King, Jillian Tamaki win English Language Governor General’s Literary Awards The central motif of this memoir-style novel is the “mirror,” specifically movies, a kind of mirror that silvers over sordid reality with glamour and fame. Jude describes everything that happens to him in cinematic terms. His middle school is a movie set. “No one was real. Especially me. We were all just playing our parts.” His peers fall into one of three categories: “The Crew”— kids engaged in school life, who participate in sports and extracurricular activities; “The Extras” — “the misfits, outcasts and social rejects”; and “The Movie Stars,”........

Read Full Article