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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

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National Post View: Mulcair’s opportunism in Quebec is reckless

Posted on 2015-06-30 09:32:00

No Canadian old enough to understand its significance will ever forget the anguished tension of Quebec’s second referendum night in November 1995. The No side won by the slimmest of margins – 50.58 per cent to 49.42 percent. As all realists well understood, the reversal of those numbers would have meant a national cataclysm. NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, back then a Liberal environment minister in Quebec’s National Assembly, has vivid memories of that fateful event. In his own riding at the time – as Mulcair used to be happy to remind audiences – he saw evidence of vote-tampering in the suspicious rejection of thousands of No votes. Back then he used to fulminate about the Yes side’s “orchestrated, manipulated electoral fraud.” Only amnesia or extreme political opportunism can explain Mulcair’s mischievous twirl of this particular poker in the buried, but ever-glowing cinders of ethnic nationalism. And so it came as a shock when, later, with his eye on the main chance federally, he so vigorously embraced the principle of a “50 per cent plus one” majority in any future Quebec referendum being sufficient to trigger negotiations on the breakup of the country. In November 2013, speaking in Montreal no less, he crowed that he would “wipe the floor” with Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau if he were to debate the issue with him. Campaigning in Quebec City on Tuesday, the day before Quebec’s annual Fête Nationale, Mulcair reaffirmed his federalist stance to reporters — on economic grounds, explaining that sovereignty is “a vision that risks really hurting the middle class” — but also reminded them of the NDP’s 2005 Sherbrooke Declaration. The Sherbrooke Declaration is a document recommending “specific powers and room for manoeuvring” to Quebec, in the name of “asymmetrical federalism” — a........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

National Post View: Mulcair’s opportunism in Quebec is reckless

Posted on 2015-06-30 09:32:00

No Canadian old enough to understand its significance will ever forget the anguished tension of Quebec’s second referendum night in November 1995. The No side won by the slimmest of margins – 50.58 per cent to 49.42 percent. As all realists well understood, the reversal of those numbers would have meant a national cataclysm. NDP Leader Thomas Mulcair, back then a Liberal environment minister in Quebec’s National Assembly, has vivid memories of that fateful event. In his own riding at the time – as Mulcair used to be happy to remind audiences – he saw evidence of vote-tampering in the suspicious rejection of thousands of No votes. Back then he used to fulminate about the Yes side’s “orchestrated, manipulated electoral fraud.” Only amnesia or extreme political opportunism can explain Mulcair’s mischievous twirl of this particular poker in the buried, but ever-glowing cinders of ethnic nationalism. And so it came as a shock when, later, with his eye on the main chance federally, he so vigorously embraced the principle of a “50 per cent plus one” majority in any future Quebec referendum being sufficient to trigger negotiations on the breakup of the country. In November 2013, speaking in Montreal no less, he crowed that he would “wipe the floor” with Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau if he were to debate the issue with him. Campaigning in Quebec City on Tuesday, the day before Quebec’s annual Fête Nationale, Mulcair reaffirmed his federalist stance to reporters — on economic grounds, explaining that sovereignty is “a vision that risks really hurting the middle class” — but also reminded them of the NDP’s 2005 Sherbrooke Declaration. The Sherbrooke Declaration is a document recommending “specific powers and room for manoeuvring” to Quebec, in the name of “asymmetrical federalism” — a........

Read Full Article