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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Ferguson is the exception, not the norm in U.S. race relations

Posted on 2014-11-27 11:47:03

Is a racism-free America a utopian dream? The recent dystopian mayhem of Ferguson, Missouri would seem to support such a pessimistic view of race relations. At times like these, with the focus on white power and black frustration and anger in a particular place, we fail to recognize the bigger picture of nation-wide social progress. Demonstrators outnumbered by media and onlookers as a Thanksgiving calm descends on Ferguson Whether due to the unseasonably cool, snowy weather or the next day’s U.S. Thanksgiving holiday, a drastically reduced number of protesters hit the streets Wednesday night to decry the police shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. Demonstrators stood at a fence outside the city’s police headquarters and loudly heckled National Guard troops, then marched several blocks north, blocking traffic temporarily at some points, but stayed peaceful. It was nothing like the arson, looting and vandalism that reigned here Monday night, or Tuesday night’s more restrained but still-tense events, when a police car was smashed with rocks, set on fire and tipped over. Our difficulty in seeing past extraordinary flash points like Ferguson is encouraged by ideologues, who depend on a theme of entrenched, ineradicable racism to justify their “progressive” activism. They will stop at nothing to convince us that racism is a kind of original sin embedded in our white genes. The term “white privilege,” frequently bandied about these days, is a locution pointing to an unproven but accepted “fact” in progressive circles: that since whiteness itself confers social power in certain situations, as for example in Ferguson – 70% black, where police, mostly white, tend to hassle blacks on spec but not whites – it is considered a form of racism in itself. A recent PBS series called The Whiteness Project enhances that view. In it white people are interviewed and discuss their biases and fears. The project, by filmmaker Whitney Dow, “hopes to........

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The Black Book of the American Left: Volume 2 — The Progressives

Barbara Kay: How utterly irrational faith-based global-warming theory is In an April 30 article, “Climate change and health: Extreme heat a ‘silent’ killer, Globe and Mail reporter Karen McColl...


Barbara Kay on how you know you’re a pit bull fanatic (Video)

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Ferguson is the exception, not the norm in U.S. race relations

Posted on 2014-11-27 11:47:03

Is a racism-free America a utopian dream? The recent dystopian mayhem of Ferguson, Missouri would seem to support such a pessimistic view of race relations. At times like these, with the focus on white power and black frustration and anger in a particular place, we fail to recognize the bigger picture of nation-wide social progress. Demonstrators outnumbered by media and onlookers as a Thanksgiving calm descends on Ferguson Whether due to the unseasonably cool, snowy weather or the next day’s U.S. Thanksgiving holiday, a drastically reduced number of protesters hit the streets Wednesday night to decry the police shooting of black teenager Michael Brown. Demonstrators stood at a fence outside the city’s police headquarters and loudly heckled National Guard troops, then marched several blocks north, blocking traffic temporarily at some points, but stayed peaceful. It was nothing like the arson, looting and vandalism that reigned here Monday night, or Tuesday night’s more restrained but still-tense events, when a police car was smashed with rocks, set on fire and tipped over. Our difficulty in seeing past extraordinary flash points like Ferguson is encouraged by ideologues, who depend on a theme of entrenched, ineradicable racism to justify their “progressive” activism. They will stop at nothing to convince us that racism is a kind of original sin embedded in our white genes. The term “white privilege,” frequently bandied about these days, is a locution pointing to an unproven but accepted “fact” in progressive circles: that since whiteness itself confers social power in certain situations, as for example in Ferguson – 70% black, where police, mostly white, tend to hassle blacks on spec but not whites – it is considered a form of racism in itself. A recent PBS series called The Whiteness Project enhances that view. In it white people are interviewed and discuss their biases and fears. The project, by filmmaker Whitney Dow, “hopes to........

Read Full Article