"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: The Dorchester Review — the little magazine that can

Posted on 2016-05-24 14:05:00

My heroes in the writing game are the contrarians who beat against cultural currents by publishing small magazines. These magazines boast rich content, but appeal to circumscribed markets. The monetary reward is zilch. Satisfaction is almost entirely bound up (both for the editor and the usually unpaid writers) with pride in the product. Which brings me to my subject for today, the biannual Dorchester Review (DR), a journal of historical commentary, celebrating its fifth anniversary with June’s forthcoming edition. (Full disclosure: I have had several long book reviews published in the DR; nevertheless, I can assure you that it is a very high-quality magazine.) It does not promote a specific ideology, but it does boast of a “robustly polemical” agenda, resisting the prevailing progressivist view that historians must choose between a right and wrong side of history. Thus, you will find in the magazine a good deal of politically incorrect and iconoclastic writing: for example, an article by Robert Henderson, “The Myth of the ‘Militia Myth,’ ” which argues that Canadians were not of lacklustre mettle in the 1812 war, as establishment historians have claimed. Proving his case with battle statistics, Henderson’s article caused a bit of a stir in the military-academic community — a good thing, ensuring continued keen attention from Canadian Forces academics in Quebec and English Canada. Similar probings of received wisdom in other areas include: Phil Buckner’s “Whatever Happened to the British Empire?” (another piece by Buckner, a review of Richard Gwyn’s biography of Sir John A. Macdonald, is the only review that questions Gwyn’s nationalistic premise that Macdonald was a perfect hero for our time); Tom Flanagan’s eyebrow-lifting “The Sexual Politics of Louis Riel;” Greg Melleuish’s “Letter from Australia” (there is........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: The Dorchester Review — the little magazine that can

Posted on 2016-05-24 14:05:00

My heroes in the writing game are the contrarians who beat against cultural currents by publishing small magazines. These magazines boast rich content, but appeal to circumscribed markets. The monetary reward is zilch. Satisfaction is almost entirely bound up (both for the editor and the usually unpaid writers) with pride in the product. Which brings me to my subject for today, the biannual Dorchester Review (DR), a journal of historical commentary, celebrating its fifth anniversary with June’s forthcoming edition. (Full disclosure: I have had several long book reviews published in the DR; nevertheless, I can assure you that it is a very high-quality magazine.) It does not promote a specific ideology, but it does boast of a “robustly polemical” agenda, resisting the prevailing progressivist view that historians must choose between a right and wrong side of history. Thus, you will find in the magazine a good deal of politically incorrect and iconoclastic writing: for example, an article by Robert Henderson, “The Myth of the ‘Militia Myth,’ ” which argues that Canadians were not of lacklustre mettle in the 1812 war, as establishment historians have claimed. Proving his case with battle statistics, Henderson’s article caused a bit of a stir in the military-academic community — a good thing, ensuring continued keen attention from Canadian Forces academics in Quebec and English Canada. Similar probings of received wisdom in other areas include: Phil Buckner’s “Whatever Happened to the British Empire?” (another piece by Buckner, a review of Richard Gwyn’s biography of Sir John A. Macdonald, is the only review that questions Gwyn’s nationalistic premise that Macdonald was a perfect hero for our time); Tom Flanagan’s eyebrow-lifting “The Sexual Politics of Louis Riel;” Greg Melleuish’s “Letter from Australia” (there is........

Read Full Article