"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Could Islamism be to blame for the Orlando attack? Perish the thought!

Posted on 2016-06-21 15:03:00

Last week, I was invited into a talk-radio forum on the Orlando massacre. It provided a good example for listeners of the competing interpretive narratives the mass killing has generated. My interlocutor positioned the massacre as a product of America’s gun culture, one in a chain of mass gun-related calamities like Columbine and Sandy Hook, coupled with a disordered mind and broad-based homophobia, a feature, she noted, of belief systems other than Islam. Though a serious problem, America’s gun culture is a sidebar here, I countered. Norway, France, Britain and Canada all have strict gun laws, but have all experienced gun massacres. Massacrists bent on their perceived mission will take what’s to hand — firearms are efficient, but if unavailable or incompatible with their vision, other weapons suffice. Ted Kaczynski (Unabomber) and the Tsarnaev brothers (Boston Marathon massacre) chose bombs. I asked what discussion we would be having if Omar Mateen had used a bomb to vent his fury against gays, as he well might have if he had not been able to purchase his AR-15. It was conceded that we would then be discussing motive, rather than opportunity. In Orlando the motive was, specifically, homophobia of a longstanding and culturally rooted virulence. Homophobia in the West is officially and almost universally deplored, even if individual gays do still suffer violence from individual homophobes (crimes that are harshly punished). But Mateen was the product of a culture in which homosexuality is universally deplored and retribution both officially and popularly endorsed — by extreme shaming at best, death at worst. Progressives are fervently devoted both to gay rights and to multiculturalism. So they are faced with a conundrum. If they blame Islamic culture for promoting homophobia of a kind that seems to sanction actual violence, they will be perceived by fellow progressives........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: Could Islamism be to blame for the Orlando attack? Perish the thought!

Posted on 2016-06-21 15:03:00

Last week, I was invited into a talk-radio forum on the Orlando massacre. It provided a good example for listeners of the competing interpretive narratives the mass killing has generated. My interlocutor positioned the massacre as a product of America’s gun culture, one in a chain of mass gun-related calamities like Columbine and Sandy Hook, coupled with a disordered mind and broad-based homophobia, a feature, she noted, of belief systems other than Islam. Though a serious problem, America’s gun culture is a sidebar here, I countered. Norway, France, Britain and Canada all have strict gun laws, but have all experienced gun massacres. Massacrists bent on their perceived mission will take what’s to hand — firearms are efficient, but if unavailable or incompatible with their vision, other weapons suffice. Ted Kaczynski (Unabomber) and the Tsarnaev brothers (Boston Marathon massacre) chose bombs. I asked what discussion we would be having if Omar Mateen had used a bomb to vent his fury against gays, as he well might have if he had not been able to purchase his AR-15. It was conceded that we would then be discussing motive, rather than opportunity. In Orlando the motive was, specifically, homophobia of a longstanding and culturally rooted virulence. Homophobia in the West is officially and almost universally deplored, even if individual gays do still suffer violence from individual homophobes (crimes that are harshly punished). But Mateen was the product of a culture in which homosexuality is universally deplored and retribution both officially and popularly endorsed — by extreme shaming at best, death at worst. Progressives are fervently devoted both to gay rights and to multiculturalism. So they are faced with a conundrum. If they blame Islamic culture for promoting homophobia of a kind that seems to sanction actual violence, they will be perceived by fellow progressives........

Read Full Article