"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

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Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

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Barbara Kay: How progressives perverted the study of history

Posted on 2016-08-30 13:10:32

Pulitzer-prize winning historian Barbara Tuchman had neither a PhD nor an academic title. ”It’s what saved me,” she said. ”If I had taken a doctoral degree, it would have stifled any writing capacity.” Tuchman’s illustrious career reminds us that history, although a discipline, does not require professional accreditation to explore. Beyond writing, research and organizational competence, one requires only a passion for knowledge about human nature and a sharp eye for the patterns to which it has given rise throughout the ages. Thomas Carlyle considered history writing the first example of man’s creative thought: “there is no tribe so rude that it has not attempted history.” The ancient Greeks thought so highly of history that they accorded it its own muse — Clio, one of Memory’s seven daughters. Sociology cannot boast so old or distinguished a lineage. Although philosophers have studied man in society for thousands of years, it was only in the 19th century that it emerged as a “science” (in quotation marks because almost from the beginning, it shed the objectivity and disinterestedness that is supposed to govern scientific inquiry). From the 1960s forward, when the New Left started calling themselves “progressives,” sociology was subsumed into the Marxist agenda as an activist tool for social engineering. As one textbook defines sociology’s mission today, it is “to alleviate human suffering and make society a better place to live.” This is political activism, not truth-seeking. Like many humanities’ disciplines — gender studies springs immediately to mind — sociology quickly became what high-ranking sociologist Stanislav Andreski called “a sloppy pseudo-science.” And pseudo-sciences are to pure intellectual inquiry as astrology is to astronomy. The displacement of traditional history by sociological progressivism is the subject of a new book by Saskatchewan historian Curtis R. McManus, titled Clio’s Bastards, or The........

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BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: How progressives perverted the study of history

Posted on 2016-08-30 13:10:32

Pulitzer-prize winning historian Barbara Tuchman had neither a PhD nor an academic title. ”It’s what saved me,” she said. ”If I had taken a doctoral degree, it would have stifled any writing capacity.” Tuchman’s illustrious career reminds us that history, although a discipline, does not require professional accreditation to explore. Beyond writing, research and organizational competence, one requires only a passion for knowledge about human nature and a sharp eye for the patterns to which it has given rise throughout the ages. Thomas Carlyle considered history writing the first example of man’s creative thought: “there is no tribe so rude that it has not attempted history.” The ancient Greeks thought so highly of history that they accorded it its own muse — Clio, one of Memory’s seven daughters. Sociology cannot boast so old or distinguished a lineage. Although philosophers have studied man in society for thousands of years, it was only in the 19th century that it emerged as a “science” (in quotation marks because almost from the beginning, it shed the objectivity and disinterestedness that is supposed to govern scientific inquiry). From the 1960s forward, when the New Left started calling themselves “progressives,” sociology was subsumed into the Marxist agenda as an activist tool for social engineering. As one textbook defines sociology’s mission today, it is “to alleviate human suffering and make society a better place to live.” This is political activism, not truth-seeking. Like many humanities’ disciplines — gender studies springs immediately to mind — sociology quickly became what high-ranking sociologist Stanislav Andreski called “a sloppy pseudo-science.” And pseudo-sciences are to pure intellectual inquiry as astrology is to astronomy. The displacement of traditional history by sociological progressivism is the subject of a new book by Saskatchewan historian Curtis R. McManus, titled Clio’s Bastards, or The........

Read Full Article