"Barbara Kay knows a thing or two about good writing. As one Canada’s most widely read columnists in the National Post, she’s expressed herself forcefully and cogently for years, never mincing her words, garnering the applause of readers and sometimes their ire."

Read full testimonial


BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: David Brown — the black leader America needs

Posted on 2016-07-19 13:25:22

On Sunday, a remarkable exchange took place between outspoken Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke and CNN’s Don Lemon (both black) after the Baton Rouge, La., incident in which three police officers were killed (one black) and three wounded, by a black man whose social media posts suggested a racial motivation for the attack. It’s worth watching. Lemon represents the “correct” response to the mayhem (solemn, “our hearts are reeling”), while Clarke is crackling with righteous indignation against Black Lives Matter, the activist group he blames for the violence. “I’ve been watching this for two years. I’ve predicted this,” he said, referring to BLM as a “hateful ideology.” Lemon, visibly agitated, called for a break when Clarke refused to moderate the “vibe.” In a second round, Clarke attacked U.S. President Barack Obama for “lying” in tarring law enforcement as systemically racist, pointing to recent studies that show the opposite. Lemon kept trying to say that the actual data on black crime had nothing to do with BLM, but Clarke wasn’t having that. The segment ended in an impasse. RelatedChristie Blatchford: When citizens target police, all bets are offRobyn Urback: How can Black Lives Matter claim ‘victory’ when Pride has left so many divided? Clarke’s bullying tone wasn’t pretty. But he laid bare the problem with the ”conversation” we are supposed to be having about racism. BLM and its supporters, including the media, with Lemon an excellent example, talk about disproportionate profiling and aggression in dealing with black males by police, but when their interlocutors talk about the actual data – the disproportion in violent crime by blacks and the highly disproportionate risks to police doing their jobs which helps to explain the profiling and aggressive policing in high-crime areas — the conversation ends. President Obama is cool where Clarke is hot, but he has not been helpful. He is not only sympathetic to BLM (even though he publicly decries........

Read Full Article

NEWEST BOOK


CONNECT


Twitter

FEATURED ARTICLES

  • Kay vs. Kay – Round 2 (Read)
  • Kay vs. Kay (Read)
  • Review of Culture Wars: Volume V by Barbara Kay (Read)

LATEST ARTICLES

  • On Sunday, a remarkable exchange took place between outspoken Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke and CNN’s Don Lemon (both black) after the Baton Rouge, La., incident in which three police officers were killed (one... (Read)
  • Poor, poor, poor Gwen Stefani. The Hollywood star split from her rocker husband Gavin Rossdale in 2015. But that’s not why we must pity her. After all, Stefani’s marriage lasted longer than those of most of her... (Read)
  • Until I was 10 and bundled off to overnight summer camp, I spent whole summers in Balfour Beach, a 50-family community near Keswick on the south end of Lake Simcoe, a relatively short commute for fathers on... (Read)
  • Don’t you just hate it when you invite the new folks next door to dinner so they can meet the neighbours, and then they arrive an hour late, after which they trash your cooking skills and demand better wine? Pride... (Read)
  • Two stories this week turn on a misunderstanding of the word “indigenous.” On June 21, Conservative MP Jason Kenney tweeted: “On Aboriginal Day we honour those who first settled in Canada, and their generations of... (Read)
More Articles...


BARBARA KAY RELEASES FIRST NOVEL, A QUEBEC-BASED MURDER MYSTERY


One of the most controversial writers in Canada, National Post columnist and acclaimed author Barbara Kay, makes her first foray into fiction with the release of “A Three Day Event,” a murder mystery underscored by sociopolitical tensions in a Quebec horse sport community.

Loosely based on actual events faced by the Kay family, A Three-Day Event takes readers back to 1992, and the Eastern Townships of Quebec, where Le Centre Équestre de l’Estrie is playing host to a horse sport competition for Olympic hopefuls. Heightened by linguistic and class tensions, cracks begin to appear in the community’s sunny facade. Le Centre is suddenly jarred by a series of violent events: Anti-Anglophone vandalism, an assault on a stallion and other conflicts culminating in the murder of the centre’s reviled stable boy. Former champion jumper Polo Poisson takes the reins as chief sleuth and discovers that nearly everyone in the stable is a suspect.

Award-winning Montreal novelist Glen Rotchin praises Kay’s venture into fiction: “It’s polished, richly imagined and suspenseful, everything you’d want in a murder mystery. This is a novel that rises far above the level of a typical first novel.”

“Many non-fiction writers are curious to know whether they can pull off a work of fiction. I too wondered for decades, but it wasn’t until my daughter was betrayed by her mentor in horse sport that I found my inspiration,” Kay said. “Suddenly my ten years of immersion in the fascinating world of high-stakes three-day eventing competition opened a creative seam I had never thought possible.”

Read an excerpt of this book

Read More


Bill Maher 1, Chrystia Freeland 0

Latest Column

Barbara Kay: David Brown — the black leader America needs

Posted on 2016-07-19 13:25:22

On Sunday, a remarkable exchange took place between outspoken Milwaukee Sheriff David Clarke and CNN’s Don Lemon (both black) after the Baton Rouge, La., incident in which three police officers were killed (one black) and three wounded, by a black man whose social media posts suggested a racial motivation for the attack. It’s worth watching. Lemon represents the “correct” response to the mayhem (solemn, “our hearts are reeling”), while Clarke is crackling with righteous indignation against Black Lives Matter, the activist group he blames for the violence. “I’ve been watching this for two years. I’ve predicted this,” he said, referring to BLM as a “hateful ideology.” Lemon, visibly agitated, called for a break when Clarke refused to moderate the “vibe.” In a second round, Clarke attacked U.S. President Barack Obama for “lying” in tarring law enforcement as systemically racist, pointing to recent studies that show the opposite. Lemon kept trying to say that the actual data on black crime had nothing to do with BLM, but Clarke wasn’t having that. The segment ended in an impasse. RelatedChristie Blatchford: When citizens target police, all bets are offRobyn Urback: How can Black Lives Matter claim ‘victory’ when Pride has left so many divided? Clarke’s bullying tone wasn’t pretty. But he laid bare the problem with the ”conversation” we are supposed to be having about racism. BLM and its supporters, including the media, with Lemon an excellent example, talk about disproportionate profiling and aggression in dealing with black males by police, but when their interlocutors talk about the actual data – the disproportion in violent crime by blacks and the highly disproportionate risks to police doing their jobs which helps to explain the profiling and aggressive policing in high-crime areas — the conversation ends. President Obama is cool where Clarke is hot, but he has not been helpful. He is not only sympathetic to BLM (even though he publicly decries........

Read Full Article